Defining the distance from your house, business, or main structure (e.g. horse stables) to the boundaries of your property is vital in the process of determining whether you should stay or leave your property early on a bad fire day.

This area is known as your "defendable space". The amount of space you have around your home and how you manage it plays a part in determining whether you meet the minimum requirements for defendable space on your property.

Having at least the minimum requirements for defendable space is a key factor in helping you make the decision of whether you should stay or leave early on a bad fire day.

If you do not have enough defendable space, or if the required fire fuel reduction work can’t be done on your own property, then it’s time to rethink your decisions about whether you should stay on your property during a bushfire.

If your house, business or main structure is close to your property boundary, your neighbours’ property will have a big impact on your defendable space and subsequent decisions about staying or leaving early on a bad fire day. It is vital to understand that the fuel loads on neighbouring properties need to be factored into your decision-making as it will effect fire intensity at your own home.

It's equally important to realise that if the land beyond your property boundary is being managed to the defendable space vegetation management requirements it may be appropriate to include it as part of your defendable space. Understandably this instance will impact your decision making regarding staying or leaving early as well.

It's really important to continue to monitor the vegetation outside your property boundary during the summer. If the vegetation changes during summer then you should re-calculate your defendable space requirements and make appropriate decisions regarding staying or leaving early on a bad fire day.