Rules for native vegetation :: CFS

Rules for native vegetation

Bushfire is a real risk for all South Australians and you can't predict when a bushfire will strike. But your chances of survival are increased if you are prepared.

The State Government, CFS and Native Vegetation Council and Local Councils are working together to protect life and property, while still recognising the value of native vegetation.

New rules are now in place to make it easier for you to be better bushfire prepared. Follow the seven simple steps to prepare your property today.

As part of your overall bushfire preparedness, you should consider clearing your property of native grasses, shrubs and small trees where required.

A suite of simple and user-friendly publications has been developed which clearly communicate these new rules.

What is the new process? 7 simple steps...

  1. Decide what type of action you wish to undertake to manage native vegetation on your property for bushfire safety purposes. Need assistance? Refer to the Decision Making Matrix below.
  2. View the corresponding fact sheets that will inform you of what you can do to reduce, modify or remove native vegetation for bushfire preparedness, and whether any further approvals are required.
  3. If further approvals are required, download the application form.
  4. Fill out the sections of the applications form that relate to the activity you wish to undertake.
  5. Submit your application form to your local CFS Regional Office via fax, post or in person.
  6. On receipt of your form, the CFS will contact you to discuss your application request and if necessary meet you on-site for an inspection.
  7. The CFS will then advise you of the outcome of your application.

Native Vegetation Management Decision-Making Matrix

Reason? What can be done? Is approval needed?
To protect a building You can reduce, modify or remove native vegetation within 20m of a building (including overhanging limbs). Significant trees may be protected under Development Act 1993. Contact your local Council for further information. No
  You can modify or remove native vegetation further than 20m from a building to reduce fuel loads. Yes
To protect a structure You can reduce, modify or remove native vegetation within 5m of a structure (including overhanging limbs). Significant trees may be protected under Development Act 1993. Contact your local Council for further information. No
  You can modify or remove native vegetation further than 5m from a structure to reduce fuel loads. Yes
To reduce fuel strategically Fuel loads can be strategically reduced or modified on any private or public land. Yes
To construct a fuel break You can remove vegetation to construct a fuel break up to 5m wide. No
  In some regions you can remove native vegetation to construct a fuel break up to 7.5m wide (see below for a list of regions). No
  On a property used for primary production, you can remove native vegetation to construct a fuel break up to 20m wide. Yes
  You can remove native vegetation to construct fuel breaks greater than 20m wide. Yes
To construct fire access tracks You can remove native vegetation to construct fire access tracks that are consistent with the standards detailed below. Yes

Native vegetation management publications

Fact Sheets

Five individual fact sheets have been developed based on key native vegetation clearance measures and are intended for the general public.

Decide what type of action you wish to undertake to manage native vegetation on your property for bushfire safety purposes:

Guide

This guide has been developed by Native Vegetation Council to specifically assist local councils and CFS Officers. It has been developed as a simple, user-friendly interpretation of the new regulations and is intended to be a reference for local council and MFS/CFS officers.

Reduce the impact of bushfire

Application Form

Application to manage native vegetation to reduce the impact of bushfire.

The application form is an improved version of pre-existing forms. It has been simplified and colour coded in-line with the fact sheets.

If your plan is to use fire to manage the bushfire fuel, you'll need to complete an operational burn plan and submit it for approval by your CFS Regional Prevention Officer.

Submit your application form to your local CFS Regional Office via fax, post or in person.

Frequently Asked Questions