Hazardous Chemicals Emergency Planning

Lodge Emergency Plan

Do you have a site with a notifiable quantity of hazardous chemicals? (Notifiable quantity in relation to notifying Safework SA).

If you do, then you are required to create an emergency plan and submit a copy to the South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS) or South Australian Country Fire Service (CFS). 

Download the Emergency Plan Submission form here

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Please email your completed plan and associated forms to samfsscientificofficer@samfs.sa.gov.au. The MFS will acknowledge receipt of all emails within two working days. If you have not received an acknowledgement within this timeframe please phone the MFS Scientific Officer on 08 8204 3600.

Note: There is a 10MB limit on emails that the MFS can receive. If your email is larger than this, please split the documents over two or more emails.

Application

The information contained on this page applies specifically to the following types of sites:

  • Sites with Manifest quantities of Hazardous Chemicals as detailed in Schedule 11 of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2012, (i.e. Sites required to inform Safework SA of notifiable quantities of Hazardous Chemicals stored or handled on site); or
  • Major Hazard Facilities (and Potential Major Hazard Facilities) as defined in Schedule 15 of the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012.

Scope

A brief overview of the legislation which relates specifically to Emergency Plans and information relating to emergency planning in general is outlined below:

Regulation 361 of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2012

Sites with Manifest Quantities of Hazardous Chemicals as detailed in Schedule 11 of the WHS Reg. are subject to the provisions of Regulation 361 of the above regulation.

Regulation 361 requires a specific emergency plan to be developed for hazardous chemicals which exceed the manifest quantities detailed in Schedule 11 of the WHS Reg.

Regulation 361 requires a draft Emergency Plan to be submitted to the MFS and/or CFS and the site operator must take note of any written advice received from MFS and/or CFS regarding deficiencies or inclusions required in the final Emergency Plan.

Regulation 557 of the Work Health and Safety Regulation 2012

Major Hazard Facilities (MHF's) or provisionally registered MHF's that are registered with Safework SA are subject to the provisions of Regulation 557.

Regulation 557 requires a draft Emergency Plan to be submitted to the MFS and/or CFS and the site operator must ensure that the emergency plan addresses any recommendation made by the emergency service organisations consulted. The operator must test the emergency plan in accordance with recommendations made by the emergency services organisations consulted.

Regulation 557 requires the site operator to notify the emergency services consulted of the occurrence of an incident or event.

The above clauses require an Emergency Plan to be developed for the site.  A draft Emergency Plan is required to be submitted to the MFS or the CFS.  The site operator must take note of any written advice received from the MFS and/or CFS regarding deficiencies or inclusions required in the final Emergency Plan.

For further comprehensive information on the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Regulations please go to the Safework SA website or the South Australian Legislation website.

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Further Information

The Work Health and Safety Regulations, requires employers, controllers of premises, occupiers of Dangerous Goods sites and operators of MHF's to carry out a thorough risk assessment to identify, eliminate or control hazards and risks at the site.

Clauses 361 and 557 have specific requirements in relation to Hazardous Chemicals (listed in Schedule 11 of the WHS Reg.) and materials used, stored or handled at MHF's (listed in Schedule 15 of the WHS Reg.).

The MFS and CFS recommends that a whole of site approach to the development of a comprehensive Emergency Plan is adopted. The Emergency Plan should be developed using the site risk assessment as a basis for determining what is required for inclusion in the plan.

Developing a holistic and comprehensive Emergency Plan should assist operators and license holders in meeting their compliance obligations under the above clauses.

An Emergency Plan is an informative document which acquaints facility occupants with the specific procedures to be implemented during an emergency. The Emergency Plan also outlines standard operational guidelines for use by facility emergency controllers and other personnel who may required to fulfil a key functional role during the various stages of an emergency.

MFS and CFS recommends that staff are provided with regular training in implementing the procedures contained in the emergency plan. Local emergency services should also be invited to participate in emergency exercises.

An emergency plan will also contain critical information which can assist emergency services personnel formulate appropriate incident management strategies and tactics when attending an emergency involving your facility.

The emergency plan is a critical component in implementing appropriate emergency management strategies, so it is important that the plan is logical, comprehensive, easy to read and use.

The development of an Emergency Plan will assist in ensuring that the effects of any incident are minimised. The consequences arising from an incident involving a facilities hazards and risks must also be appropriately addressed by the plan.

The development of an Emergency Plan by persons not familiar with risk assessment, hazardous chemical hazards, associated consequences and emergency planning in general may result in the implementation of a deficient Emergency Plan. Unfortunately, shortcomings in Emergency Plans may not become apparent until an emergency incident occurs.

If you are unfamiliar with the process of assessing hazardous chemical hazards and risks, or not sure that you will be able to develop a comprehensive document, the MFS and CFS recommends that you engage the services of a qualified hazardous chemical consultant who will be able to assist you in the development of a comprehensive and functional Emergency Plan.

A number of hazardous chemical consultants are members of the Australasian Institute of Dangerous Goods Consultants (http://www.aidgc.org.au/consultants.asp).

While the MFS and CFS websites contains a guideline and other information to assist you in developing an Emergency Plan, it is stressed that the obligation for the identification of hazards and the development of a comprehensive Emergency Plan is the responsibility of the site operator.

To assist operators and license holders in developing a comprehensive emergency plan, the MFS and CFS have also developed a general emergency plan guideline (Emergency Plans at Facilities having Notifiable Quantities of Hazardous Chemicals and Major Hazard Facilities, Special Risks Department Guideline No. 001).

The above document is available from the MFS and CFS websites and they recommend that the policy is referred to when developing your sites Emergency Plan.

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Flow Chart

A flow chart which details how your draft Emergency Plan is processed by the MFS or CFS is also available on their websites.

The flow chart can be downloaded here.

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Emergency Plan Links

Safework SA – Work Health and Safety website

Safework SA – SA Work Health and Safety Bill and Regulations

Safework Australia – Emergency Plans factsheet

Safework Australia – Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals in the Workplace

Safework Australia – Guide for Major Hazard Facilities Emergency Plans

Safework Australia – Guide for Major Hazard Facilities Preparation of a Safety Case

Safework Australia – Guide for Major Hazard Facilities Providing Information to the Community

Safework Australia – Guide for Major Hazard Facilities Safety Assessment

Safework Australia – Other guides, factsheets and relevant publications

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